What not to do with toenail fungus?

Avoid going barefoot in public areas. Keep your feet clean and dry.

What not to do with toenail fungus?

Avoid going barefoot in public areas. Keep your feet clean and dry. Wash them with soap and water every day. Dry them very well afterwards.

Clean, dry feet and nails are less likely to get a fungus. Mushrooms thrive in damp places, such as damp shoes. You can reduce this growth by letting the shoes dry for 24 hours before you wear them again. Wash your feet thoroughly with soap and water every day, taking care to wash between your toes.

Dry your feet thoroughly after washing them. You should also avoid having wet or sweaty feet for too long. A humid and warm area provides the perfect area for mushrooms to thrive. Toenail fungus occurs when fungus gets between the toenail and the toenail bed (tissue just below the toenail).

Nail fungus is a common condition that starts as a white or yellow spot under the tip of the fingernail or toenail. The experts at Easton Dermatology Associates offer personalized treatment for your exact situation, whether you have noticed an irregularity in your toenail or have been fighting fungus for a while. Toenail fungus usually starts subtly, so you may not notice anything different on the nail immediately. Only a laboratory test on a scraping of the toenail can prove with certainty that the fungus is responsible for distortion of the nail.

Discuss the pros and cons of toenail fungus treatment with your provider to determine what is best for you. Misdiagnosing toenail fungus can cost you time and money trying over-the-counter products that have no effect. The most effective toenail fungus treatment for you will largely depend on your symptoms and situation. The fungus has been declared eradicated and new, clear nails are already being grown to replace the once war-torn battlefields.

It may take several months to remove toenail fungus because even nails that grow at an average rate do not grow quickly. Another problem is that untreated fungi can eventually spread to neighboring toenails or to the skin of the foot, causing athlete's foot. Unfortunately, most cases are not discovered until the fungus has had a good chance of entrenching itself in the toenail.

Glenna Ellegood
Glenna Ellegood

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